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It’s all about NEUROSCIENCE 

FRIDAY – JANUARY 27th, 2012 – 1pm – PST! 

Mark Brady, Ph.D. is a neuroscience educator.  He co-founded the Children’s Grief Program at Kara, a public service agency in Palo Alto, California where he only stopped volunteering upon moving to Whidbey Island.

In addition to being a long-time member of  the graduate research faculty at the Institute for Transpersonal Psychology, he writes a weekly column on social neuroscience for parents (The Committed Parent).

He is the prize-winning author of a number of books, magazine articles and academic papers. Two recent titles are: Safe and Secure: A Guide to Parenting with the Brain in Mind and A Father’s Book of Listening. These and other titles can be ordered wherever fine books are sold on the Internet or by emailing: paideia@gmail.com. He is currently working on a new book on helping children escape childhood unscathed. It will be available in September, 2012.

ON a special MAIL-IN only ballot set for May 17th – Whidbey General Hospital will be asking property owners of Whidbey Island to OK a 50million dollar bond to increase and improve the hospital’s health care services to the community.
The next scheduled public forums for this bond are as follows.
  • Thursday, March 24 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 6:00 pm, Coupeville Library
  • Monday, March 28 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 1:30 pm, Oak Harbor Senior Center

 

Joining Gwen on KWPA’s Whidbey Chat this week were Coupeville Lion’s President, Dennis Bullock and, member and “Zone Chairman” John Kohlmann, for an interview about the Coupeville Lions Club.

Anyone who has been to Coupeville has seen the big Lion’s emblem on Coupeville’s welcome sign at Hwy 525 and Main St.  But, do they know just how many lives and community projects they touched.  Dennis Bullock, sitting Coupeville Lions president and member John Kohlmann are just two of our island citizen’s who are members of just one of our 5 island Lions clubs.

With a membership of 112 – the Coupeville Lions is the larger of the 2 clubs in the central Whidbey area.  The other is Central Whidbey Lions with a smaller membership, but no less good work done.  Dennis and John say there are multiple clubs for multiple reasons – could be the meetings are on the wrong day for some one’s schedule so they choose to start another club to better fit theirs and others free hours.  None the less, it doesn’t matter, as these Lions said, all Lions Clubs are good Lions clubs.

The Coupeville Lions, in particular, hold the infamous Garage Sale people come from miles around to attend.  They also hold an annual Scholarship benefiting dinner and auction, where Gwen’s co-host on What’s Up Whidbey, Harry Anderson seems to always get the heritage turkey up for auction, and that’s just two of the big events Coupeville Lions maintain annually.

LISTEN to this interview for more!   AND contact the Coupeville Lions to inquire about their annual open house – if you’d like to find out about joining the club –  April 13th, 2011 at the Methodist Church in Coupeville.  YOU must make contact & have a Lion invite you to attend this event – per the limited number of seats available.

Contact information for the Coupeville Lions – PO Box 473, Coupeville, 98239 – 360-678-4105

coupevillelions@juno.com

Visit the Coupeville Lions website: www.coupevillelions.org

Coupeville Lions Calendar pdf.

Listen to this interview re-air on Thursday March 24th, 2011 at 9am & Friday, March 25th, 2011 at 4pm.  YOU can tune into 96.9fm around the Penn Cove area of Whidbey Island – OR listen through your computer at the KWPA listen page.

This interview will appear on the podcast page of KWPA in 30 days.

WHIDBEY GENERAL HOSPITAL SEEKS FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM PROPERTY OWNERS

KWPA had Whidbey General Hospital CEO, Tom Tomasino and CFO, Joe Vessey in the studio on March 7th for an interview about the up coming – MAIL IN ONLY – special ballot for the 50 million dollar bond the hospital is seeking from the property owners of Whidbey.

The interview will re-air on KWPA on Thursday – March 11th at 4pm – from 96.9fm around Penn Cove and streamed from the KWPA “listen” page.

IN and effort to help the citizen’s of Whidbey get as much information as possible about this bond, KWPA will be airing this interview with Tom Tomasino and Joe Vessey repeatedly over the weeks leading up to the May 17th vote.  Gwen will inform you of the days and times – on Monday – March 14th.

Below – you can find times and locations of upcoming public forums pertaining to educating the public about the hospital’s need, and newspaper articles related to the bond.

KWPA would like to thank Whidbey General Hospital, Tom Tomasino, Joe Vessey and Trish Rose for making this interview possible.

GWEN – would like to thank Harry Anderson for taking the chair as host for this interview.

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WHIDBEY HOSPITAL SPECIAL ELECTION BOND PUBLIC FORUMS

  • Tuesday, March 22 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 12:30 pm, Bayview Senior Center
  • Thursday, March 24 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 6:00 pm, Coupeville Library
  • Monday, March 28 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 1:30 pm, Oak Harbor Senior Center

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Feb 16, 2011 – Whidbey Examiner – Hospital Approves 50 Million Bond – By Sue Ellen White

http://whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=5371

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Feb. 2, 2011 – Whidbey News Times – Lower values increase Whidbey General Hospital bond rate – By NATHAN WHALEN

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/115044444.html

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Jan. 26, 2011 – Whidbey Examiner – Bond Needed for Whidbey General ExpansionBy Toni Grove

http://www.whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=5237

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Dec. 18, 2010 Whidbey News Times Editorial: Sell hospital bond with enthusiasm

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/opinion/112084729.html

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DEC 15, 2010 – Whidbey News Times – Whidbey General Hospital gets closer to its $50-million bond proposalBy JUSTIN BURNETT

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/111937594.html

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May 12, 2010 – Whidbey Examiner – Hospital Board Considers 50 Million Bond MeasureBy Justin Burnett

http://www.whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=3896

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May 11, 2101 – Commissioners consider Whidbey General Hospital bond – Whidbey News TimesBy JENNY MANNING

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/93455149.html

 

Whidbey General Hospital CEO Tom Tomasino and his CFO Joe Vessey joined Harry Anderson and Gwen in the KWPA studio for an interview about the upcoming 50 Bond Whidbey General is seeking from voters.

The special ballot (MAIL IN ONLY) will take place on May 17, and looks to be very important to the future of health care on Whidbey Island, so says CEO Tomasino and those who are in favor of the bond.  The bond will add pennies to your property tax – but none the less some voters are asking a lot of questions.

Harry Anderson took the roll of host for this interview, which aired lived today at 11am.  The interview will rebroadcast on 96.9 FM around Penn Cove or streamed over your computer from the KWPA website – on Thursday – March 10 at 9am and Friday March 11 at 4pm.  After that the interview will appear on the KWPA schedule weekly and be available as a podcast on the KWPA site.  KWPA hopes this interview will help the property owners of Whidbey Island be sufficiently informed prior to the special election on May 17th

Several community meetings have been planned in the coming weeks to help inform citizens of the bond.  WGH’s strategic plan calls for replacing the hospital’s 40 year old inpatient wing. YOU can hear hospital CEO, Mr. Tom Tomasino, talk about the hospital district’s near and long term goals to continue to provide quality healthcare on Whidbey Island

  • Tuesday, March 22 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 12:30 pm, Bayview Senior Center
  • Thursday, March 24 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 6:00 pm, Coupeville Library
  • Monday, March 28 – OPEN COMMUNITY MEETING, 1:30 pm, Oak Harbor Senior Center

In an effort to provide KWPA listeners with as much information as possible about this bond we have loaded up links to several of the newspaper articles that have been published explaining the bond to property owners.

Feb 16, 2011 – Whidbey Examiner – Hospital Approves 50 Million Bond – By Sue Ellen White

http://whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=5371

~

Feb. 2, 2011 – Whidbey News Times – Lower values increase Whidbey General Hospital bond rate – By NATHAN WHALEN

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/115044444.html

~

Jan. 26, 2011 – Whidbey Examiner – Bond Needed for Whidbey General ExpansionBy Toni Grove

http://www.whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=5237

~

Dec. 18, 2010 Whidbey News Times Editorial: Sell hospital bond with enthusiasm

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/opinion/112084729.html

~

DEC 15, 2010 – Whidbey News Times – Whidbey General Hospital gets closer to its $50-million bond proposalBy JUSTIN BURNETT

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/111937594.html

~

May 12, 2010 – Whidbey Examiner – Hospital Board Considers 50 Million Bond MeasureBy Justin Burnett

http://www.whidbeyexaminer.com/main.asp SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=3896

~

May 11, 2101 – Commissioners consider Whidbey General Hospital bond – Whidbey News TimesBy JENNY MANNING

http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/whidbey/wnt/news/93455149.html

 

2011 MUSSEL FESTIVAL EVENTS

The Penn Cove MusselFest Headquarters is located at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.
Tickets for Saturday and Sunday festival activities must be purchased there.

Parking is available next to the Coupeville Library off of NW Alexander Street and at the Island County Buildings on Main Street (a 3 block walk to downtown and the Rec Hall)

Friday, March 4, 5:30pm-8:30pm
Saturday, March 5, 10:30am-9pm
Sunday, March 6, 10:30am-5pm

Click on the 2011 Penn Cove Mussel Festival poster to go to their official site.

ENJOY – WHIDBEY, HISTORIC COUPEVILLE and YUMMY PENN COVE MUSSELS!

Plumeria - at the Case Farm

Shelia & Mike Case-Smith make farming seem like fun.  The energy and attitude up at Case Farm, north of Oak Harbor, has a casual but hardworking feel about it.

112 years since her Great Grandfather, Alonzo Case, started the family farm, the Case-Smith family continues to foster diverse and healthy farming, on land that has the familial memory of a Whidbey Island history book.

Along with their three children, two girls and a boy, and their assorted feathered and hairy friends, Shelia and Mike produce enough food to feed their family, their extended families and three Whidbey Island Farmer’s Markets.

Listen to Shelia Case-Smith talk about the Case Farm

Known for their powerhouse tomato plants, great produce, fall pumpkin patch and countless other plants and veggies, Sheila and Mike, are trying their hand at unusual delicious and sweet smelling produce (an flowers) most people would never dream of growing in the Pacific Northwest.  With a daughter who has traveled the world and Shelia’s trip to Hawaii, the farm is home to such trees as olive, lemon, lime, banana, not to mention the lemon grass, a coconut, plumeria and numerous other unusual plants the Case-Smith’s nudge along.

Not your “run of the mill” farmer, Shelia uses an unusual marketing tactic to make an impact on her customers.  And her husband, Mike, can also be found using this same tactic impress those who stop by the pumpkin patch in the fall.   Listen to Gwen’s interview with Sheila to find out what the tactic is.

Listen to Shelia Case-Smith talk about the Case Farm

Pictured above is one of the Plumeria blossoms Shelia and Mike have in their greenhouse.  Gwen is sorry to say the batteries on her camera conked out, after the second photo – so you’ll have to wait to see more pictures of the Case Farm in Oak Harbor.

THANKS TO SHELIA AND MIKE – for allowing KWPA and Gwen up to the farm!  This interview continues and enhances the Whidbey Chat Farm Tour for Your Ears!

We hope listener’s enjoy getting to know the farmers who make Whidbey Island’s farming community world class!

The Whidbey Chat Farm Tour for Your Ears has Gwen traipsing around Whidbey Island seeking out the farmer’s who make the island a world-class foodie location.   Many of those interviewed, to date, are farming acres – 3, 6, 8, 12.  And then there is Carolyn Gardener, of Fennel Forest Farm, who is growing produce in a 40×40 foot square area – just enough to keep her well rooted as a vendor at the Coupeville Farmer’s Market.

Click here to listen to Carolyn Gardener talk about her postage stamp garden – Fennel Forest Farm

Fennel Forest Farm Lettuce - PRETTY PERFECT!

Carolyn Gardener is deliberate, focused and organized – just the traits to have when you are trying to get enough produce yield to sell at market, out of a little bit of land.  Calling her farm Fennel Forest for herb that monopolizes much of her hill on the south-west side of Whidbey Island, Carolyn has carved out a sweet little fenced area – to protect her raised beds from deer and other creatures – growing the multitude of crops that end up delicious meals for her loyal Coupeville Farmer’s Market customers.

Carolyn Gardener uses slick tricks to keep her produce happy and healthy. Look closely at the edge of the raised beds here - COPPER flashing is wrapped around each bed at the top. Listen to her tell you why she does that. It's inexpensive and attractive!

Seriously committed to growing healthy and chemical free foods, Carolyn never uses anything toxic on her plants.  She does not fight bugs, pathogens, or creatures that slither though Fennel Forest Farm with anything but organic measures, hard work and slick tricks.

Carolyn warms her plants against the chill of the west side of this Pacific Northwest garden with simple practices. Find out what these are and how she uses them in this interview. Note one of her two BIG solar panels at the top left corner of this picture - looks small here - but it's a hefty boost against her carbon footprint. And Carolyn does not waste valuable water on an island that can be very dry in the summer by watering the paths between her beds. Preferring to suffer with a touch of brown grass in the dead of summer.

This interview will help anyone – gardening in a small area – triumph at harvest time.  Take advantage of Carolyn’s trials and errors, to learn some valuable lessons about growing, maintaining and protecting your produce.

It's recycled and "simply" works!

Acquiring many of her hardware materials at the recycling center, Carolyn uses ingenuity and recycling practices to turn common household items into simple solutions for any garden problem.  Too cold for your tomatoes?  Too many slugs to fight?  Are birds eating your seeds before they germinate?  Carolyn Gardener has a simple answer for what most of us think as the insurmountable problems, that might drive us to stay in bed and avoid looking at what maimed or ate our garden overnight.

Click here to listen to Carolyn Gardener talk about her postage stamp garden – Fennel Forest Farm

Mmmm - a perfect cabbage at Fennel Forest Farm - see any bug holes on there - NOPE!

If you’ve ever wondered how Carolyn Gardener of Fennel Forest Farm produces so much produce on such a small designated plot of land, or what the differences are between a gardener and a farmer – this interview will answer your questions.

THANK YOU – Carolyn for having KWPA and Gwen out to your sweet garden plot – Fennel Forest Farm!!!!

Click here to listen to Carolyn Gardener talk about her postage stamp garden – Fennel Forest Farm

Mmmmmm - Carrots, planted with a beet compliment, are coming on at Fennel Forest Farm!

Fennel Forest Farms beds - 6'x3' and 12'x3' - are planted, harvested and replanted often in the same season - companion planting and best use of space make for big results at Fennel Forest!

All things lavender - even t-shirts

Sarah Richards could be called the Lavender Queen of Whidbey Island – but she’s a little too humble to take the crown.  Still she’s planted and developed her business, Lavender Wind Farm, on the west side of Whidbey, overlooking the San Juan Straight and Olympic Peninsula, into a haven for all things lavender – and it’s got some real WOW FACTOR going for it.

Click here to listen to Sarah Richards – talk about Lavender Wind Farm, yesterday, today and tomorrow

Starting with 5 acres, purchased from the Darst family, a long time farming family on Whidbey, Sarah has added 3 and 3 quarters acres for a grand total of 8 3/4 acres – of sandy loam soil that makes her lavender happy and her products varied.

Billowing Clouds of Lavender fill the eyes and nose at Lavender Wind Farm

Breaking ground on the property in 1998, Sarah planted some lavender as a wind break for her garden.  Those plants were not much for breaking wind, but they did procreate well, and now Lavender Wind Farm is very close to 10,000 lavender plants – and counting.

Take a harvesting lesson from Sarah Richards - who wields a chainsaw to harvest her crop

Along with a wonderful staff, Sarah has been able to grow her lavender and her farm into a bustling business.  She is devoted to her crop and attends lavender conferences all over the world – keeping up on the latest trends and maybe having a day trip she might call a vacation.

During her interview with Gwen, Sarah speaks eloquently about the lavender labyrinth she and her crew planted up at the farm back in 2001.  Finished in the spring of 2002, the labyrinth is a special place people come to walk and meditate through, finding solace, joy and resolve, or whatever it is they need, to find, through their journey in and out of the beautiful maze.  Using a Hopi tradition called Man in the Maze to design the labyrinth, Sarah is committed to caring for it and making it available to those who seek it out.

The Lavender Wind Farm - Hopi Tradition Labyrinth - Man in the Maze

Along with Rick Blank, Mare Chapman, Nancy Guptill, Jodi Davis, Kathy Haven, Mary Vaughan, Younes Moumou (intern) and Eli Merrell (summer student help and world class weeder), Sarah makes Lavender Wind Farm a wonderful place to work (unless her employees are fibbing) and a beautiful place to visit.

Click here to listen to Sarah Richards – talk about Lavender Wind Farm, yesterday, today and tomorrow

and check out these “strange” (Gwen’s words) lavender products she makes…  We can attest to the ICE CREAM – not pictured here – cause it’s GONE!   Every visit to Lavender Wind Farm causes an ice cream bar to disappear….

June 14, 2010 – Whidbey Chat with Gwen Sam

Whidbey artist Perry Woodfin strolled down the Coupeville wharf this morning to join Gwen in the KWPA studio for a little conversation.

Painting what surrounds him, Perry Woodfin says, 'I feel each piece of my art is like a word (or sentence), and when all is said and done I would hope people would say I had something interesting to say.' Pictured here - Coupeville Wharf, 2004. 10.5"x16.5" - Watercolor. Original Available. ~ About the Coupville wharf, home of KWPA's studio, Perry Woodfin says, "An elderly man told me about being a child in Coupeville in the 1930s. His parents wouldn't let him go out on the wharf without an adult present, so he and his friends would sneak out and hide in an outhouse situated on it's deck. They fished through the hole in it's floor.

A Pacific Northwest native, Perry Woodfin makes a full-time job out of selling his paintings.  With an impressive track record in the corporate working world, this Whidbey Island resident can now be found selling his watercolor paintings in local galleries, at the Greenbank and Coupeville Farmer’s Market’s, and from his website.  A world traveler, new technology student and easy-going gentleman Perry Woodfin is a Whidbey artist with plum.

Telling Gwen and listeners about his grand and great grand parents westward migration to the Pacific Northwest, settlement in Palouse and stage-coach service they ran, Perry is the product of pioneers, and a father who owned a large chicken farm in Palouse, where he grew up and was laden with farm chores.

Bringing up an image from every American child’s memory, Perry described the little red wagon that is his earliest memory of making art.   While sitting on his mother’s lap, Perry said, she drew a little red wagon, then handed him the pencil and paper and asked him to draw one too.  That little drawing by a four year old, the American icon we all know and love, would be Perry Woodfin’s first original piece of art.

Years later, as a young teen, after his parent’s divorce and his father’s remarrage, another woman, his step-mother, Jananne (Nan) Goltz, would play a pivotal role in pointing him towards art again.   In a dramatic story, he tells how on the eve of his departure to a world-class animal husbandry program at a foreign university well-known for its veterinary medicine department, his step-mother told him she believed he was headed into veterinary medicine not because he loved it; but because he wanted to make his father proud, by following in his farming footsteps.  Nan challenged Perry to take a few art courses at a Pacific Northwest university before he embarked to faraway lands and studied to become a vetrinarian.   Just out of high school, Perry conceded and signed up for classes at Washington State University.  It was those classes that would change his life’s course forever.  Now, 45 years later, Perry Woodfin is the artist he was meant to be, since first drawing that little red wagon.

Perry’s spoke to Gwen, and listener’s, about his realist work, how he balances the need to make a living as an artist, by producing what will sell and be collected, and his need to express himself in more abstract or metaphorical works, not easy to sell or heavily collected.

One of Perry's pieces the couple was considering - To Aid One, 1991. 13.5"x18.25" Watercolor NFS

The other piece the couple considered - Anacortes Fuel, 2001. 11"x16" Watercolor. NFS

Perry recounted witnessing the difficult decision a couple were having at the Greenbank Market this past weekend, trying to decide which of his images to purchase.  The couple were headed to a foriegn county on an educational mission and wanted something that would help them describe where they were from in America. To hear more about this decision making process, and the lengths that couple went to to come to a final decision – listen to the interview.  But until then, you choose from the two Perry Woodfin pieces pictured here.  The two the couple were weighing the balance of.  Which one would you choose?  

Perry Woodfin’s interview exposes some of the history and inner thoughts of a man, and artist, many people on the island, and in the world, know and collect.   From that moment on his mother’s knee, to today, Perry’s story of becoming and being a full time artist is interesting, intuitive and humorous.

Ironically, on the heels of KWPA’s smash hit “OLD TIME RADIO LIVE ON STAGE” shows at Fort Casey yesterday, Perry also talked about how radio played a part in is life as a young boy.  Born in the 1940’s, the hey day of radio comedies and drama’s, Perry shared some of his favorite old-time radio shows of the era, and how those shows kept him company as a young boy, like they did so many of us.

Perry Woodfin

THANK YOU PERRY ! – for taking the time to come down to KWPA and visit with Gwen and Whidbey Chat listeners!  We’ll be looking to hear you again!  Safe travels.

Listen to the recordings of this interview on Thursday, June 17th, at 9am and or Friday, June 18th at 4pm.  The show airs on 96.9fm in the Coupeville area of Whidbey Island, and streams worldwide on the internet from the KWPA website.

POSTSCRIPT: PERRY WOODFIN is also a poet.   Some other time, on Whidbey Chat with Gwen Sam, Perry Woodfin will share his thoughts and inspirations on poetry.

The poem below is an obvious strand from Perry’s life growing up on his father’s large chicken farm in Palouse.  A tribute to the beloved writer Betty McDonald (1908-1958), a Vason Island writer who was a friend of his father’s and lived on a farm near them.  Though Perry only met her once – she inspired something in Perry he still carry’s with him today.  An egg…

The Egg and Me

Copyright by Perry Woodfin

When her name comes up, as it has on occasion,

I reminisce about our only meeting.

We had climbed the long flight to the ferry boat cabin.

We stop suddenly at the top.

A woman is coming down.

Dad and Mom talk with her.

Dad, proud, introduces me, his boy.

Then he tells me, “This is Betty MacDonald.

”To me she’s just a another grown up.

I seem to remember all of that.

I think she had on silk stockings, high heels.

There may also have been white gloves, perfume.

I wonder if I’ve invented all this ?

It’s just a memory, a brief moment in time.

As I said, on occasion it has come up.

Then I turn it over, move it around,

gaining nothing except what is here.

Well, maybe a slight scent of sophistication;

maybe a touch of class.

But have I hatched this too ?

Questions remain as questions always seem to do,

just laying there.

~~

“Whenever I catch a ferry and see that high flight, small memories like this, soar. Hope you enjoy this. I like poetry for its more immediate creative outlet (usually). More immediate than painting, anyway. The poem describes an incident that occurred in, I would guess, about 1950.” – Perry Woodfin

More on Perry’s father Donald A. Woodfin (1920-2004), an interesting and hardworking man, who eventually moved from Vashon to Whidbey Island, where he lived for 26 years before his death.

The Betty MacDonald Farm is a historic farm and takes overnight guests.

 

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